Flexible Work

Happy workers: How satisfied are Australians at work?

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mwah. and Curtin University are excited to share the Happy workers: How satisfied are Australians at work? report.

"This research is first of its kind in Australia and looks at what makes us happy at work. Is it what we do? Is it the way we work? Who we work with? Our actual occupation? The industry we work in? How much does pay and security matter? Is business size important?  

Some really interesting myths busted!"

Interesting in knowing more? Easy – just click here to access the report.

Future of Work in Australia: Preparing for Tomorrow’s World (BCEC Report)

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This Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Report "examines the way in which the organisation of work is changing – from workforces to workplaces – and the implications of these changes for Australia.

The organisation of work is changing. With alternative forms of employment, freelancing and the gig economy on the rise, the traditional notion of holding down a steady job or two for an entire career is receding fast.

And as new technologies and automation take over some of the tasks previously performed by human labour, and industries move offshore, the service sector continues to forge ahead as the major player in the future of work.

But are we placing too much emphasis on technology and not enough on the quality of jobs that we should strive to create in the workplaces of the future?

Is now the time for workers to return to education and begin re-skilling? What kinds of careers can our children expect and where should they focus their education?"

To read the report click here.

How Remote Work Supports 7 of the UN Sustainable Development Goals

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This article was written by Robert Hawkins for our friends at 1 Million for Work Flexibility.

Flexible work continues to spread and grow, driven largely by the voices of parents (especially mothers) who no longer feel they should have to choose between caring for their family and having a fulfilling career.

But flexibility doesn’t just benefit working mothers; in fact, it has incredible, real benefits for all people who work, their families, and the world around us. To demonstrate, this article takes a novel approach and outlines the ways flexibility—specifically remote working, or the ability to regularly work away from the centralized workplace—supports the UN Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs).

These 17 Goals, created by the United Nations Development Program and adopted in 2015 by 193 countries, are “a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity.”

It can also be rolled out quickly and cheaply, and provides an attractive method to boost the success of the SDGs. This is particularly important now as the latest UN progress report has found there is a high risk that many of the SDGs will not be reached by their target date of 2030.

Remote work supports seven of the UN Sustainable Development Goals.  To read the entire article please click here.

From a Sailboat?

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“All roles flex”, “Work from anywhere”. A tad too ambitious maybe? Will the day ever come when I can flip up my laptop, put in a day’s work from my sailboat and my boss won’t think I’m taking the ....? Because let’s face it, that’s the dream.

It’s such a conundrum. Work for myself, most likely pay myself zero, all the flexibility in the world. Work for someone else, with the comfort of financial security, but must be within eyesight at all time… and instantly feel guilty if I’m running 15 minutes late for work!

Now obviously I’m generalising and there are certainly companies out there advocating for flexible working, walking the talk, implementing new initiatives, striving for outputs over attendance, but even to those of you in this bucket I ask, “If I delivered on my outputs to the highest of standards, but from a sailboat in the Mediterranean, would that be okay?” Could be wrong, but I doubt it.

And why not? Is it a lack of trust or belief in my capability? Is it because you don’t have a yacht and therefore I shouldn’t work from mine? Is it because of some outdated ergonomics policy that puts it in the “too hard” basket? Is it because, “It’s just not the done thing”? All of which seem like inadequate responses to me.

In this age of productivity, continuous improvement, cost cutting and doing more with less, I challenge you, “Why can’t I work from anywhere I like?”

A recent survey shows the vast majority of employees would be happy to take less money for added flexibility and it’s not gender specific. We have but one life to get out there, to see the world, to experience everything on offer, to watch our children learn and grow (in more than 4 weeks of annual leave).  With mental health issues on the rise and our lives so full of information we can never switch off isn’t it time for something radical before we all turn into robots…..or are replaced by them?

I heard someone speak the other day about his dream to utilise technology to a point where the office could be removed, all 100 staff could work remotely and employees would bid for work. A job board where, if you’ve got some time today you can put your hand up for the work, but if you’re busy (lunching in Portofino) you can take the day off. Turning the office into a freelancer marketplace that would mean reduced overheads for the company, no rent, only paying staff when they’re utilised, most likely paying them less for the added flexibility they’re afforded.

Not 100% sure I agree with the last part – if I’m doing the same job, pay me the same money, but would I work for less if you let me work from my sailboat? Absolutely!

Click here to read the full article by Meg Burrage.

Having a flexible approach to work – do the benefits outweigh challenges?

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A flexible approach to work is now commonplace in many workplaces, not just for the chosen lucky few, but for all. A vast majority of roles can now be worked flex. But many organisations and leaders still struggle to normalise flexible work fearing that too much flexibility will lead to lost productivity and chaos in their teams. How can the benefits of flexible work outweigh the challenges, here’s how we’re making it work at Parents At Work.  

We’re a small business, there’s less than 10 of us supporting thousands of busy working parents everyday. If one person is sick, on leave or not working on a particular given day, like any small team, we feel it.  However, it’s our flexible attitude to work that’s allowed us and the business to thrive.  We’ve built and fostered a culture that means our flexible approach to work actually helps our business to grow and be agile to change. And boy are we uber productive. Every member of the team has their own way of working it.

For more, read the full article here: https://parentsandcarersatwork.com/having-a-flexible-approach-to-work-do-the-benefits-outweigh-challenges/